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Activity Number
28
Not Editable
Important Notice!
Overview and Learning Objectives
Assessment
Classroom Practice
Central Concepts
Textbook References
Benchmarks and Standards
Activity Credits
Requirements
Technical Notes

Gas Diffusion: On Your Marks, Get Set, Go! (Windows only)

Interactive, scaffolded model

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Important Notice!

The activity will work properly on Windows and OS 10.4+ with Java 5.0 updates installed.

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Overview and Learning Objectives

Students experiment with a computer model to determine how mass affects diffusion of various gasses in a glass tube.

Students will be able to:

  • determine how mass of different gasses affects diffusion;
  • predict the approximate location of a precipitate formed between gasses diffusing from opposite ends of a tube.

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Assessment

See questions 1 and 2 from the following pre/post-test:

http://www.concord.org/~barbara/workbench_web/unit1/prepost_atoms.html

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Classroom Practice

This activity is one of a larger module: Atoms in Motion

(http://www.concord.org/~barbara/workbench_web/unit1/index.html).

In the context of the module, students will:

  • interpret the results of actual and simulated experiments and describe why those results occurred;
  • predict the approximate location of a precipitate formed between gasses diffusing from opposite ends of a tube.

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Central Concepts

Key Concept:

If mixed together, molecules with various masses will move at different speeds related to their mass.

Additional Related Concepts

Biology

  • Waste Disposal

Physics/Chemistry

  • Collision
  • Diffusion
  • Gas
  • Gradient
  • Kinetic motion
  • Random kinetic motion

Systems

  • Equilibrium

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Textbook References

  • Biology (Miller and Levine) Prentice Hall 5th Edition - Unit 9 (Human Biology) Chapter 40 - Repiratory System
  • Biology: Exploring Life - Chapter 5: The Molecules of Life
  • BSCS Blue (8th Edition) - Chapter 1: The Chemistry of Life
  • Web of Life - Chapter 2: Chemical Basis of Life

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Benchmarks and Standards

NSES

  • Life-Science: Matter, energy, and organization - 1 All matter tends toward more disorganized states (Full Text of Standard)

  • Physical-Science: Atomic Structure - 1 Matter is made of minute particles (Full Text of Standard)

  • Physical-Science: Energy Conservation / Entropy - 4 Everything tends to become less organized and less orderly over time (Full Text of Standard)

  • Physical-Science: Matter Structure/Properties - 4 The physical properties of compounds reflect the nature of the interactions (Full Text of Standard)

  • Physical-Science: Motions and Forces - 1 Objects change their motion only when a net force is applied (Full Text of Standard)

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Activity Credits

Created by CC Project: Molecular Workbench using Molecular Workbench + Pedagogica

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Requirements

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Technical Notes

Because of a problem with Flash, this does not currently work on most Macs.

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These materials are based upon work supported
by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers
9980620, ESI-0242701 and EIA-0219345

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